Jul 06

In this especially timely, painstakingly positive work, a children’s film coach recounts her adoption of a troubled Russian toddler and her long, tortuous, ultimately enlightening journey to treat his nonverbal autism. A former actress, Hall worked as a successful “baby wrangler” for Hollywood feature films; 40-something, married nine years, active in her Jewish faith, and devastated by successive miscarriages, she along with her then husband traveled to an orphanage in Yekaterinburg, Russia, to adopt a quiet two-year-old. Neal, as she named him, couldn’t speak or make eye contact, and despite Hall’s belief in his innate intelligence, the boy was eventually diagnosed with “severe sensory dysfunction.” She beautifully chronicles Neal’s development to the age of his bar mitzvah vis-a-vis his responses–positive and negative–to the slew of experts and coaches Hall found to create therapies tailored to his very individual needs. Though Hall’s marriage dissolved under the pressure of Neal’s care, and there were moments Hall truly believed she and her son were “slouching toward normal,” she had to accept that Neal would never be “cured” of autism. She created her life’s work in the Miracle Project, a theater arts program for autistic kids (eventually made into the Emmy Award–winning documentary Autism: The Musical). More >>

Now I See the Moon: A Mother, a Son, a Miracle

Jul 05

When her father found the washing machine crammed with everything from her sneakers to her barrettes, 12-year-old Jennifer Traig had a simple explanation: They’d been tainted by the pork fumes emanating from the kitchen and had to be cleansed. The same fumes compelled Jennifer to wash her hands for 30 minutes before dinner. Jennifer’s childhood mania was the result of her then undiagnosed Obsessive Compulsive Disorder joining forces with her Hebrew studies. Whi… More >>

Devil in the Details

Jun 05

Jennifer Rosner’s revelatory memoir explores family, silence, and what it means to be heard. When her daughters are born deaf, Rosner is stunned. Then she discovers a hidden history of deafness in her family, going back generations to the Jewish enclaves of Eastern Europe. Traveling back in time, she imagines her silent relatives, who showed surprising creativity in dealing with a world that preferred to ignore them.

Rosner shares her journey into the mode… More >>

If a Tree Falls: A Family’s Quest to Hear and Be Heard

Disability Books Design by  wordpress themes