Nov 03


Cory Friedman woke up one morning when he was five years old with the uncontrollable urge to twitch his neck. From that day forward his life became a hell of irrepressible tics and involuntary utterances, and Cory embarked on an excruciating journey from specialist to specialist to discover the cause of his disease. Soon it became unclear what tics were symptoms of his disease and what were side effects of the countless combinations of drugs. The only certainty is that it kept getting worse.

Read more about Against Medical Advice: One Family’s Struggle with an Agonizing Medical Mystery.

Oct 08


Beth Luxenberg was an only child. Everyone knew it: her grown children, her friends, even people she’d only recently met. So when her secret emerged, her son Steve Luxenberg was bewildered. He was certain that his mother had no siblings, just as he knew that her name was Beth, and that she had raised her children, above all, to tell the truth. By then, Beth was nearly eighty, and in fragile health. While seeing a new doctor, she had casually mentioned a disabled sister, sent away at age two.

Read more about Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey Into a Family Secret.

Sep 11


In 1983, Jane Bernstein had everything she ever wanted: a healthy four-year-old daughter, Charlotte; a happy marriage; a highly praised first novel; and a brand new baby, Rachel. But by the time Rachel was six weeks old, a neuro-ophthalmologist told Jane and her husband that their baby was blind. Although there was some hope that Rachel might gain partial vision as she grew, her condition was one that often resulted in seizure disorders and intellectual impairment. So began a series of medical a…

Read more about Loving Rachel: A Family’s Journey from Grief.

Jul 11

Humorist Cathy Crimmins has written a deeply personal, wrenching, and often hilarious account of the effects of traumatic brain injury, not only on the victim, in this case her husband, but on the family.

When her husband Alan is injured in a speedboat accident, Cathy Crimmins reluctantly assumes the role of caregiver and learns to cope with the person he has become. No longer the man who loved obscure Japanese cinema and wry humor, Crimmins’ husband has emer… More >>

Where is the Mango Princess? A Journey Back from Brain Injury

Jul 06

In this especially timely, painstakingly positive work, a children’s film coach recounts her adoption of a troubled Russian toddler and her long, tortuous, ultimately enlightening journey to treat his nonverbal autism. A former actress, Hall worked as a successful “baby wrangler” for Hollywood feature films; 40-something, married nine years, active in her Jewish faith, and devastated by successive miscarriages, she along with her then husband traveled to an orphanage in Yekaterinburg, Russia, to adopt a quiet two-year-old. Neal, as she named him, couldn’t speak or make eye contact, and despite Hall’s belief in his innate intelligence, the boy was eventually diagnosed with “severe sensory dysfunction.” She beautifully chronicles Neal’s development to the age of his bar mitzvah vis-a-vis his responses–positive and negative–to the slew of experts and coaches Hall found to create therapies tailored to his very individual needs. Though Hall’s marriage dissolved under the pressure of Neal’s care, and there were moments Hall truly believed she and her son were “slouching toward normal,” she had to accept that Neal would never be “cured” of autism. She created her life’s work in the Miracle Project, a theater arts program for autistic kids (eventually made into the Emmy Award–winning documentary Autism: The Musical). More >>

Now I See the Moon: A Mother, a Son, a Miracle

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