Aug 24


In this absorbing story of the changing life of a community, the authors of Deaf in America reveal historical events and forces that have shaped the ways that Deaf people define themselves today. Inside Deaf Culture relates Deaf people’s search for a voice of their own, and their proud self-discovery and self-description as a flourishing culture. Padden and Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralis…

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Jul 31


Disability Workbook for Social Security Applicants (7th edition, Rev. March 2008) by Douglas M. Smith, Attorney at Law Review: More than two-thirds of claims for Social Security disability are denied in the initial decision. In this updated Disability Workbook for Social Security Applicants, experienced disability lawyer Douglas Smith guides applicants through the process with the goal of getting benefits promptly, without unnecessary appeals. The new edition discusses the “proofs” …

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Jul 20


In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, municipal laws targeting “unsightly beggars” sprang up in cities across America. Seeming to criminalize disability and thus offering a visceral example of discrimination, these “ugly laws” have become a sort of shorthand for oppression in disability studies, law, and the arts.In this watershed study of the ugly laws, Susan M. Schweik uncovers the murky history behind the laws, situating the varied legislation in its historical context and…

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Jul 16

From an acclaimed anthologist, a stellar collection of stories about teens with disabilities — and the tenacity, spirit, and humor that drive them.

Chris Crutcher takes us on a wild ride through the mind of a teen with ADD, while David Lubar’s protagonist gets a sobering lesson from his friends. In Gail Giles’s tale, Brad can’t help barking at his classmates but finds understanding when he gives a comical (and informative) presentation to his entire school. And Robert Lipsyte…

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Jul 11

Humorist Cathy Crimmins has written a deeply personal, wrenching, and often hilarious account of the effects of traumatic brain injury, not only on the victim, in this case her husband, but on the family.

When her husband Alan is injured in a speedboat accident, Cathy Crimmins reluctantly assumes the role of caregiver and learns to cope with the person he has become. No longer the man who loved obscure Japanese cinema and wry humor, Crimmins’ husband has emer… More >>

Where is the Mango Princess? A Journey Back from Brain Injury

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