Jun 28

The Five Love Languages Audio CD

Posted by Soliloquy in Books on CD

For partners seeking harmony, how we express ourselves is as important as what we say. This CD helps us figure out which words and actions our spouse interprets as loving and affirming, and which ones are indifferent and demeaning. Unhappiness in marriage often has a simple root cause: we speak different love languages, believes Dr. Gary Chapman. While working as a marriage co… More >>

The Five Love Languages Audio CD

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  • How’s your relationship with your mate? Your children? Your parents? Your siblings? It may be a matter of the state of the “love tank”.

    Author Gary Chapman in his book The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate believes everyone has a love tank, and that tank is filled by different love languages. These five languages are Gifts, Words of Affirmation, Quality of Time, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch.

    Often, we tend to give love in the languages we are most fluent in, which usually ends up being the languages that fill up our love tank. This would be why a husband who does yard work, dishes, car maintenance, etc. (Acts of Service) is floored when his wife says “You never show me you love me. You never cuddle with me, or caress my hair, or make the first move for sex.” (Physical Touch). Or, “Why don’t you spend time with me? Why do you work so much?” (Quality Time). And, “Why don’t you buy me flowers? Why don’t you ever get me cards or balloons…just because?” (Gifts) Or “You never tell me what I mean to you. Why don’t you ever share with me what I mean to you, or what my good qualities are?” (Words of Affirmation) But, if her language is primarily Acts of Service, she’ll feel so loved and honored because her husband does so many things for her, and thus feels “full” in her love tank.

    This may not sound like a big deal, but considering the divorce rate is 50% (as one relationship instance), and so many seem to be unhappy with their primary relationships, the concept of love languages may very well be a signficant factor in understanding self and others, and in relationship growth. Perhaps relationships get rocky or arrive at an impasse because individuals are speaking a different love language than what fills up the “love tank” of the object of their affection…and a result, the recipient doesn’t feel loved. It’s not that they feel empty and unfufilled because love isn’t being given, but because the language “spoken” is not something that registers to the recipient as a form of love.

    Chapman further theorizes that we usually have 2 main love languages that fill up our tank. He also says that if a person has a hard time identifying their main love languages, they’ve either been on empty for so long and are out of touch with their needs, or they have been so filled up by their spouse, that all 5 languages tend to speak to them equally.

    A story in the book that illustrates the love tank theory is the “burnt toast syndrome”. A woman was sick in bed. Her husband would always bring her burnt toast to her when she was ailing. She was so hurt and offended by this repeated insensitivity and ignorance, that she finally burst into tears one day, and asked him why he did that…and didn’t he care? She was floored to hear him say “I’m sorry honey. I had no idea. Burnt toast is my favorite, and I gave you what I would consider my favorite breakfast…burnt toast.”

    Chapman writes: “When your spouse’s emotional love tank is full and he feels secure in your love, the whole world looks right and your spouse will move out to reach his highest potential in life. But when the love tank is empty and he feels used but not loved, the whole world looks dark and he will likely never reach his potential for good in the world.”

    I recommend this book highly. It could very well be a relationship saver!

  • The author reveals, through 25 years of counseling, that he has determined people communicate love in five basic ways.They are Quality Time, Words of Affirmation, Acts of Service, Physical Touch and Giving Gifts. For example, if my primary love language is Quality Time, then I will show my love to others by spending quality time with them. If I don’t receive that in return, my love tank will be empty. The author stresses the importance of knowing your loved one’s love language so that you can communicate love to that person in a way in which he/she feels love, so that their love tank can be continually replenished. If my spous’s love language is acts of service and he is always doing things for me to communicate his love, but I receive love through the language of quality time, I will not receive his acts of service as communicating love and therefore my love tank will be dry. I in return, must communicate my love to him through acts of service in order to fill his love tank. An empty love tank causes relationships to deteriorate.This book was excellent for teaching us to recognize the way in which our loved ones receive and feel loved.

  • It is so simple and easy to understand. After I read it, I couldn’t understand why I hadn’t realized these concepts before. I wish I could give a copy of this book to every man, woman, and child. What a wonderful world we would have if we all understood the “Five Love Languages” and spoke them to all we meet everyday!! The family is a great place to start. My family and I regularly ask eachother “How full is the ‘love tank?'”. When things are tough at school, work or life in general, we now ask eachother freely “What can I do to make your love tank full?” Sometimes only the passing of time will cure a family problem (example: problems at work), but our family’s committment to express to eachother the variety of dialects between quality time, words of affirmation, and physical touch (which seem to be the most needed of the 5 languages in our particular household when outside problems occur) can make the hardest of times go by so much easier and faster. How I wish everyone would read this book!!!

  • What I love about this book is that it is a resource that helps me with people in my life. The title mentions “mate,” yet the book gives insight to how all of us speak different love “languages.” It doesn’t necessarily mean within a romantic relationship. Some people are more inclined to give little gifts when showing someone they care. These are people who usually “expect” little gifts to show them how much they are cared about. The same goes for physically affectionate people, people who believe words said are most important, and so on. This is a great gift book for those going into relationships, those suffering from a recent relationship ending, as well as those who are in a present relationship. It’s for women and men equally. Read it and find out what language you speak and therefore desire. You’ll probably realize why roses aren’t always the answer!

  • Requests give direction to love, but demands stop the flow of love. ~Gary Chapman

    It is amazing how you will just have learned a lesson and then read it in a book, however, there are many lessons you don’t want to learn five years from now. This book is filled with ideas on how you can immediately transform your relationship from a cold grave to a peaceful island resort. Perhaps you want to change your life into an amazing adventure or you want to calm the storms.

    Gary Chapman presents five love languages. One of these languages may be your primary love language, but he takes it further and explores the dialects of love. I think that many of us want all five languages, but there are various ways each can be expressed.

    Gary explains the five languages in detail and finally you will understand why some people don’t respond to your gifts and others go wild with happy kitten joy. When you meet someone who shares your primary language it can feel like you have entered a magical country where everyone is speaking your language.

    For some individuals, “words of encouragement” will be much higher on their list than “the show of love through gifts” or “acts of service.”

    I had trouble deciding which language was my favorite, but I know I get a bit happy when I receive gifts. However, I noticed that I never complain about not receiving gifts. Gary actually made it easier to figure out when he started to talk about what you complain about most. I normally say: “You are not listening to me.”

    While I enjoy gifts, I’m never demanding in this area. So then I considered “Quality Time.” Bingo, I was very concerned about “Quality Conversation.” There is definitely “bliss” in “sympathetic dialogue.” This is actually a rare thing indeed. When you talk to people, most of the time they are more worried about what they are going to say next and when you find someone who actually listens to what you are saying and responds in a way that makes you feel understood, that is bliss.

    So, I was very happy to have discovered my primary love language and I also figured out why people in my life don’t always respond to gifts in the way I think they would. Some do and they will be getting more boxes of homemade cookies, for sure. 😉

    Gary does bring out various aspects of love that make you realize that love is not just a happy feeling of infatuation. It was interesting to read about how long the initial bliss stage lasts in most relationships and then to read about the decline and divorce rates for first, second and third marriages.

    There are examples in this book that present great hope for marriages that have grown cold or are on the rocks. Even one partner can read this book and change their relationship.

    There is a study guide at the end of the book and the questions can be used at home or in a class setting.

    “The Five Love Languages” is an essential book for marriage counselors, couples and anyone who wants to figure out how their partner responds to various forms of love.

    ~The Rebecca Review



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