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5 Responses

  • This is a story told by Death. An interesting point of view perhaps, but as it is set in Germany during World War II, perhaps it is entirely appropriate. It is also a story of a young girl, who in spite of having a life that no one would wish on anyone, still manages to have glimpses of pleasure through many small things, including the few books that she manages to acquire (or shall we say, steal).

    It is interesting to see that it appears to be targetted to young adult readers – please don’t be put off by this – it is very much an adult story about children who are doing their best to live a normal life in times of unspeakable horror. It would also be a good way to introduce more mature readers to the history of the times. But be warned, it is quite confrontational at times, and considering who the narrator is, very sad.

    To add extra punch to the story, it appears that it is the true story of the author’s grandmother. When you consider this, you realise how truly resiliant we humans are, and how occasionally, and with a bit of luck, we can hold off death for a time.

  • I am not going to tell the plot of this book yet again, Amazon and some other reviewers have done it quite well…I will tell you that this is an astounding book, a beautiful book, and a book that I know I will read again and again……

    I read a lot, two to three books a week, my family makes fun that I “love” so many that I read…but in the past few years there have only been a handful of books that when I finish reading the book I sit and try to think of who I can send a copy to, who can I share this wonderful experience with. A book that when I finish, I want to go back to the beginning and start over.

    I am a little sorry it is listed as a young adult book, I feel that if the bookstores put it in the young adult section, so many people will be missing out on a wonderful experience. Yet it is important that younger readers, high school readers, read this book too. When I was growing up, I remember reading Diary of Anne Frank, and the feelings I had when I read it…and understanding the importance of everyone reading that book. Well, this book is that important, this book is a must read.

    I am going to go back and read this author’s other book, I don’t know how it can measure up to this one, but if it is half as good, I am in for a treat.

  • Very rarely a book comes out that steals my breath away. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak is a revelation. Narrated by Death, this story follows Leisel as she steals books in Nazi Germany while she and her best friend Rudy discover the power of words, language and friendship. Zusak’s writing is mesmerizing; it’s sarcastic, emotional, sophisticated and wondrous.

    If you only read one book this year, read this one. Share it with your friends and family. I don’t expect to read anything better this year, or next year either.

  • Liesel Meminger is a Book Thief, living with a foster family in Germany during World War Two. Torn from everything she’s known, her foster father shows her the power of words as the two of them share late night reading sessions of The Grave Digger’s Handbook. Her love of books ties her to others, including the mayor’s wife and Max, the Jew the family hides in the basement.

    My own words escape me as I try to recount the beauty of this book in a short review. Rarely have I read a book as moving, as profound, as this one. Narrated by Death, this story is one that crawls under your skin and reverberates your soul with its images of Nazi Germany, friendship, and loss. The images stirred through Death’s telling are so vivid, so wonderful, so tragic. Zusak has a masterful command of language and I was astounded by the way his words brought Liesel and her world to life. We follow Liesel over the years as she learns the true meaning of family through her caring new Papa and her friendships with Max and Rudy, the boy next door who idolizes Jesse Owens.

    Just a small list of images that will stay with me forever:

    +Liesel reading to the neighbors sitting terrified in a basement waiting for the bombs to fall around them

    +A snowball fight in a basement

    +Mama arriving at school to “yell” at Liesel

    +A boy with candlelit hair standing up to a Nazi Youth Leader

    +Death gathering up the souls of children softly

    +The story of a Word Shaker

    +An accordian player accepting a cigarette as payment

    There are not enough words within me to express the beauty of this book. It will move you to laughter and tears, often at the same time. This one is a keeper that I will revisit frequently in the future. It has changed my soul. Highly, highly, highly recommended.

  • THE BOOK THIEF is a beautiful and carefully worded story, following four years in the life of young Liesel Meminger, a poor German girl who finds herself separated from her six-year-old brother (who dies) and her mother and father (taken away by the Nazi’s for being a communist), and fostered to Rosa and Hans Hubermann.

    Arriving at the Hubermann’s, nine-years-old and already burdened with great loss, Liesel forges a deep bond with her Papa, Hans – a man with a many-roomed heart – who sits with her at night when her nightmares force her awake with screams. It is during these nights that Hans teaches her to read, and they begin with the first book she ever “stole”: The Grave-Diggers Handbook, a book that fell out of the pocket of a fourteen-year-old grave digger who dug the grave for her brother. Like a kitten who finds comfort at the teat of a sow after losing its mother, Liesel begins to find comfort in words.

    The story is narrated by no less a personage than Death, although this Death is sans hooded-skull and scythe. Indeed, we learn little more about Death than he is not what we perceive him to be in our Halloween imitations, and very good at his job. Given the setting for this story, we are guaranteed of the chance to evaluate Death’s job performance.

    Zusak writes with a deft, poetic hand, his descriptions unconventional and mesmerizing. Rosa Hubermann is “a small wardrobe with a coat hung over it”. A woman’s mouth has teeth that elbow each other for room. A boy: “His tie is a pendulum, long dead in its clock.” These images jump from the page and give us a clearer picture of what we’re seeing than if Zusak had spent hours describing the tiniest detail of Rosa Hubermann’s body.

    Along the way, Liesel shares her interest in words, and in no place is that felt more potently than in her relationship with Max Vandenburg, a Jew who her parents hide in their basement. Max arrives nearly dead, and the much younger Liesel finds herself captivated by him. When the cold in the basement pushes Max to the brink of death, they move him to Liesel’s room for (I believe) eight days, where Liesel brings him small mementos and reads to him while he fights for life (and once against Death itself!). In turn, Max writes for her – and these books-within-a-book are more touching and meaningful, more full of love and hope while not betraying the slightest hint of over-dramatization, than anything I’ve come across in years. Indeed, if this story had been only about Liesel’s relationship with Max, it would have been an enormous success. It may also have been more widely read – I suspect that the length of the book and the immediacy present in Max’s story but not as equally present in other sections, put some people off.

    Before I read the book, I looked at the negative reviews (of which there are four). One review commented that the book felt like “work”. Reading Hawthorne can be work, too, but I always feel the better for having read him.



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